A child trapped in a car for less than an hour in the summer can lead to fatal heatstroke

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According to the Daily Mail on May 24, summer temperatures in cars can soar rapidly in less than an hour, and leaving children in cars can have fatal consequences of heatstroke and even death. Even parking in the shade does not prevent this from happening. U. S. researchers recently conducted detailed tests to produce more scientific data.

Researchers tracked the internal temperatures of six vehicles in Tempe, Arizona, for three days in the summer. Two silver midsize cars, two economy sedans and two MPV cars were placed in direct sunlight or shade for an hour, and the vehicles were found to be in direct sunlight. The average temperature in the car reached 116 degrees Fahrenheit, a figure that rose to 157 degrees in the dashboard area, 127 degrees at the steering wheel and 123 degrees at the seat. The average temperature in the car reached 116 degrees Fahrenheit (about 47 degrees Celsius), a figure that rose to 157 degrees in the dashboard area and 127 degrees at the steering wheel (about 52 degrees Celsius) and 123 degrees at the seat.

And cars parked in the shade, The average temperature inside reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit, 118 degrees on the dashboard, 107 degrees on the steering wheel and 105 degrees on the seat.

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The researchers then simulated the consequences of a two-year-old being trapped in a car at high temperatures, only to find that, An hour in a car in direct sunlight or two hours in a car in the shade can lead to heatstroke or even death. Because heatstroke occurs when a person’s body temperature rises to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, or 40 degrees Celsius, while a child’s temperature rises to 40 degrees Celsius after an hour in a car in direct sunlight or two hours in a car in the shade. In addition, the body temperature of children rises 3-5 times faster than that of adults.

Nancy Selover, a professor of climatology, geosciences and urban planning at Arizona State University, says that when trapped in a car, children may try to calm down at first, but when they exhale, sweat doesn’t evaporate very quickly, said Nancy Selover, a professor of climatology, geoscience and urban planning at Arizona State University. Their bodies can’t cool down.

Over the past 18 years, 30 to 60 American children have died each year as a result of being left in their cars, and this has peaked between the end of May and the beginning of September, with two to three deaths a week. Installing car sensors may help, but parents must take them seriously and make sure the child is still in the seat every time they leave the car, says Mr Selofer.

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